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is a senior fellow at our global economy, and i will sit with him and asking a few questions. and then we will turn to questions over to you, the audience. we will have simultaneous translation. my mother, may she rest in piece, is a greek language teacher. she will be rolling in a great asset to my own good piece on. so without i give you alexis tsipras. [applause] >> please join your piece to number two for the translation. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i want to express our opinions, our view on the cause of the crisis, and our vision for the necessary changes that have to take place in greece. so that we can change from becoming guinea pigs of the crisis to the country that will serve as the starting point for new, progressive changes that will lead the worldwide economy to safe harbors. and so it is a special honor for me to be here at brookings. this is a foundation with strong traditions and document conversation with facts. this is a foundation that and cn understand what's at stake, both in greece and in europe today. when i was young i remember those older than me t
as we near the 1500 mark on the s&p 500. and a 0.1% contraction is expected for the german economy in the fourth quarter. those figures will be out in just under 30 minutes. >>> the governors of the banks of italy -- trade in siena. and imf's christine legarde tells us that central bank stimulus is still needed. >> we have the central bank on the one hand which have done quite a lot, which have been the fireman, in a way. and you have the policymakers on the other hand particularly in the eurozone who have made some progress and need to keep the momentum. >> now, any minute now, we're expecting the results from germany's ifo institute. january business climate index survey is expected to rise to a reading of 103 from 102.4 in december. this, of course, follows an increase in expectations in the dew survey earlier this week. we've seen an increase in the pmi surveys for germany over the last couple of months. as the german economy particularly looking to climb out of its contraction in the fourth quarter, we're waiting on the ifo senior va to tell us whether sentiment broadly speaki
great economies, france and germany. they have been friends for 50 years. >> after centuries of conflict, they culminated in two world wars. speaking at a news conference in berlin, german chancellor angela merkel and french president francois hollande talking about that. >> they promised to unveil proposals in the coming months and it is a big step forward dr. became to power pledging to reverse the plans that merkel had championed. >> it is the first time these bundestag has had a full parliament from another country here. the french president, hollande, recalled the original spirit leading to the historic relationship. >> young people are not only our future but also the reason for the policies that we are pursuing. >> young people in both of our countries have the uncomfortable good fortune that they have never had to experience in it. but peace and democracy. >> he also addressed the economic crisis in europe and chancellor merkel followed suit. she stressed it is necessary. >> what have we learned from 50 years of franco-german friendship? our greatest problems can be solved when w
to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think one of the challenges will be for him to recognize that the economic instrument in trade is really very important. if you look at asia, the coin of the realm in asia is trade and economics and, you know, if we're going to have a rebalancing toward asia, it needs to be an economics and trade overwhelmingly. so he's got, i think, a real opportunity to help lead the administration in using all of our instruments for national power influence, particularly economic and trade. >> brown: what do you think -- i mean, i know what you think about -- we talked about this in your last book about the need for economic thinking, i guess, changing the way we think about the world. but do you think that the administration has understood that wel
hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against livle wages d woing conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. military has a new order of the day: working up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was se
in the arab world, which have taken their toll on the country's tourism industry. the economy has come to a standstill. unemployment is high. life is tougher than ever for the poor. this teacher has a big family to support. two wives, seven children. he has been hard hit by hikes in fuel prices this winter. >> the government needs to take care of the middle class. across the world, it is the middle-class sees that support the government. as long as they are not impoverished. then he says that if the political system stays the same, nothing will change. he is part of an opposition movement which boycotted the elections. as far as he is concerned, the king can stay in office, but only as a figurehead. >> the movement is calling for a change in the regime, and if that does not happen, then the next step would be the overthrow of the regime. that means the king. >> jordan is looking for a smooth transition to more democracy without a civil war like syria or an islamist government as in egypt. what happens all depends on how willing the king is to bring about change. >> tensions are running
must do better -- >> britain's economy shrank by 2.3%, worse than expected. i could make it more difficult, more expensive for it to borrow. since 2008, britain has emerged from the recession twice now, only to slide back into economic contraction, a double-dip recession. there has never been a triple- dip since the 1950's. actually, uk firms are still hiring people. >> when you look at employment, you have to look at the part of wage growth, and wage growth is negative in real terms. if you take into account inflation. the u.k.'s competitiveness is still improving, and that is why firms who are not getting the headline numbers are still willing to take people on. that is why you see this dichotomy between the employment situation, what is happening to the economy. >> u.k. figures are not good. how does the u.k. compared to continental europe? >> in terms of growth, it is difficult to compare because they go in and out of recession at different times. the unemployment is one of the key ones. britain has done remarkably well. it is something of a mystery, and it has to do with tha
. the country's economy is stagnant. most people subsist on a minimum amount of food. authorities use these launches and nuclear tests to calm these people. north korea is a great country. they even separate them, as we saw last month. as time goals on, kim's scientists and engineers will gain more knowledge and his military will become more powerful. diplomats need to use talks to counter that. and they need to encourage chinese officials to be more active in the process. >> all right. thanks, kengo. >>> voters in israel have the ruling right wing bloc now has fewer seats in the the 120-member kanesset. centrist parties and an extreme right-wing parties made gains. vote-counting is nearly finished. the right-wing bloc led by the likud party won the highest number of seats. it will take about 30, down from the 42 it held before the vote. >> translator: thank you for giving me the chance to lead israel for a third time. we must form as large a coalition as possible. i've already started on this mission tonight. >> the centrist yeshitit or there is a future party, and a stra left labor
actually a friend of the system and the economy. take a listen to this one. >> i think jpmorgan was a -- was not just a fair weather friend. we were there in good times and bad times for everybody, including nations. for spain and italy we will tell you -- we were lending $15 billion net of collateral. net derivatives, spain and italy. yes, it's governments and multi- nationals if you want to be transparent. what would you do? what would you all do? if you were my board of directors, it's easy to say don't take the risk. move out. we've been in spain and italy, one for 60 years, wur finish over 100 -- one for over 100. we're not a fair weather friend. companies want us there. we have to manage that risk. something may go wrong. >> got to tell you guys, the feedback after that panel was actually not good. a lot of people criticizing jamie just in the hallways. obviously a lot of people happy to see him defending the bank. a lot of bankers here. the mood, nature of where we are. there was some criticism. the other big news, by the way, not happening in davos -- yeah? >> i was goin
about what's happening with the domestic economy. >> yeah. rates probably close to 50% in europe. europe obviously is a collection of smaller companies. if you're historically in those countries you've had to reach out much sooner than american companies have. they're global leaders in their industry around the world. they just happen to be based here in europe and one of our key messages of the last four years has been buy european countries and make sure they have as little exposure as possible. that's generally the message. there's more competition in the market now even from peripheral countries benefiting in the risk rally. >> i wonder about philips, too, reporting tomorrow. are they seen similar to alcoa as the barometer? >> i think, you know, any big company which comes out and meaningfully beats or disappoints the market, european equities are up .25% from the lows in the summer. it could be any number of big stocks which sets the near term direction of the market. overall, it's very unlikely. the corporate sector has within its power to greatly disappoint or please the markets a
.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news for the spanish economy. >>> now in a long-anticipated speech on the future of britain in the european union, prime minister cameron has warned that democratic consent from a u.k. membership is "wafer thin." speaking in london, he said he's in favor of having e.u. referendum but not at the moment and urged e.u. leaders to address the challenges currently alienating the electorate. >> there's a gap between the e.u. and citizens which has grown dramatically in recent years and which represents a lack of democratic accountability and consent that is, yes, felt particularly acutely here in britain. now if we don't address these challenges, the sdarj that europe will -- danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >> i spoke to unilever's paul pohlman to get his thoughts on the strained relationship with the european union and whether a potential u.k. exit is bad for business. >> if you create a certain level of uncertainty between now and 2017 or whatever the date is of a proposed referendum i
hillary clinton testifying on the benghazi attack. melissa: is the economy and low beer? we have an exclusive interview with the american trucking corporation bill graves. lori: the big apple shrinking? the new trend of micro- apartments in manhattan. 250 square feet. melissa: time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. let's head to the floor of the new york stock exchange where nicole petallides is standing by. nicole: i saw pictures of those apartments, i would love to buy one. they actually look very cute. let's take a look at some of the earnings related names. let's start at mcdonald's. it is up about a half% here. they expect the management -- that is not great news there. you can see the up arrow. when you talk about airlines they are up about three and a 3%. good news there despite the fact that superstar did actually cripple operations for some time. despite that, they did come in with an income of 37 billion compared with 18 million year-over-year. that is why you are seeing it up over 3%. united technologies which is to the upside. hitting 52 week highs today. you
of it, how much the circumstances the economy was unable to brand obama. >> the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a set -- was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the intrusiveness expansion of the pyramid. it was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and there was a referendum about the size and reach of government. and it was a pure ideological election. because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for president. you want boating up and down on a figure. you were voting on issues and the dominant issue was obama and as a scare, the stimulus committee increase in spending, the expansion of the government. or to put it in a more abstract and grand was the difference between federal and state which was tilting more toward state. when the question is put that way, the country shows itself to be center-right country. had republicans been able to duplicate those conditions, that framework in 2012, they would have won. but it is not the same election. 2010 is almost purel
when those numbers come out and will a good number what will it say about the economy, where it is? >> it depends on what the good number is right in the expectation is for about 175 thousand jobs, clearly a positive number moving in the right direction, but understand, you know, we need to create better than 300,000 jobs every month in order to really get out of this hole that we're in. that being said, i think you're going to get a preliminary look at the jobs number on wednesday, adp, they will come out wednesday with their sometiesti. any positive number is a good number. anything in or around 165 will be viewed as certainly expected. don't expect, you know they massive reaction as a result. >>> this economy like an indecisive lover, isn't it? earnings, coming up. boeing, ford, caterpillar, all big players out there, good indicator of where the economy is heading. what do you expect to see there? >> listen, we have seen earnings this quarter come in, 72% of the earnings so far have wasn't the estimates, but investors should understand the estimates have been slashed for the fou
. as much as it is frustrating, so many of us thought, where the economy is right now, with what we are passing on to the next generation, we all see that. talking to one another, you just could not imagine the public would send this guy back to office. for me, that was the hardest part. how do people do that if they really were paying attention and -- to what was going on? the more i talked to people, they stuck with the current guy , it became clear that they don't really know what is going on. whether you want to call it low information voters or what have you, they are not digging in. they have not been personally affected the way they are probably about to be with obamacare and a lot of these things. it is too bad you have to get hit before you realize what is going on. i think there are 10 reasons that we lost. there are probably a lot more. we have to be very careful that we do not try to find, what is that one thing? voter turnout that didn't work. if we just had that computer system working better. maybe that would have made all the difference in ohio. maybe it was the fact
minister is going to put britain after years of uncertainty and take a huge gamble with our economy. he is running scared of ukip, and he cannot deliver for britain. >> i have a polite to say to the right honorable gentleman that his whole argument about there being uncertainty is fatally undermined by the fact that he cannot answer whether he wants a referendum or not. can i give him a little bit of advice? he needs to go away, get a policy, come back and tell us what it is. in the meantime, our approach is what the british people want. it is right for business, it is right for our economy, and we will fight for it. >> and around the world, 170 million children under the age of five are stunted. that means that they are so malnourished that it has affected their physical and possibly their cognitive development. the world has enough food for everyone. as leading non-governmental organizations such as saving the children watch a major campaign, will the prime minister tell us what action the cable taking during its presidency of the g eight? >> my honorable friend is absolutely right to
of an economy. steams you come there and you obviously things don't always always come through. northbound suggested it's because the adjectives are fun. do you buy that? >> no. i would say the last couple of years, people were pretty negative. i have to say, though i've only been here a day, people are pretty positive this time. a bit more optimistic about what might be happening. i wouldn't say it's time to pop champagne, but people have been more positive this year. >> thank you for being here. joe, becky, back to you guys. we'll see new a little bit. we have a fun segment for you at 6:30. >> you do. i looked through some of the stuff, andrew. you're a regular skier. >> it's a little embarrassing, but we'll show it to you. >> don't give it away. >> but your heel -- >> there it is. >> your heel is not tethers to the ski, right? that's what makes it -- right? >> this is a different type of skiing that i had never done before. >> oh, god. good. >> now you've got the piece. you'll see it. there might be a fall or two involved. >> that's how your hair got messed up yesterday. >>> coming, wha
economy. they're celebrating the 50th anniversary of reconciliation. the elysee treaty was signed in 1963. commemorative events were held tuesday in britain -- in berlin, that is. french and german ministers held a joint cabinet meeting in the city. german chancellor angela america 8 and french president francois hollande made a statement together in parliament to emphasize their ties. they say they're determined to boost cooperation to help europe overcome its challenges. merkel said germany and france will soon make joi proposals to deepen economic integration in the eu. >>> the european debt crisis has revealed rifts between member countries. but merkel and hollande say they hope the celebrations will highlight the e.u.'s ties. >>> and now let's get a check on markets. first taking a look at the currencies, the dollar is lower against the yen as traders are taking profits following the recent advance. the dollar against the yen changing hands at 88.74-76. the u.s. currency was trading at the 89-yen level before the bank of japan announcements. market players see the outcome of the b.o.
. the debt ceiling, we need that certainty for the markets, for our economy. we know what happened when the republicans played around with not raising the debt ceiling in august of 2011. the economy was deeply hurt. we're in a recovery and we certainly should not let the republicans let us slip back with failing to provide that kind of certainty and not only the american markets but the global markets. >> congresswoman schwartz, thanks so much for coming on the program after a long weekend. appreciate it. >>> carrie, what's the republican strategy here? what happened with this extension? >> well, it's hard to view this as anything but a retreat of sorts. i mean, a few weeks ago, certainly in december, there was a lot of talk about using the debt limit in february to extract more from the president and the fact that they're pushing it back shows that they were not as confident in that position as they would like. they were pretty isolated in terms of the position. the business community was telling them not to do it. high profile conservatives were saying the same. this now sets them up
in the global economy despite some of the revenue company is headed into 2013. >> there is good news for renters, bay area rents are flattening out. according to a new survey of apartment complexes by " real sex ", written in the east bay, peninsula and san francisco were almost unchanged in the fourth quarter of 2012 and declined slightly in the south bay. experts say that red flag could be caused by some renters decided to buy homes since interest rates are so low. >> fremont wholefoods groundbreaking is scheduled for friday. the 39,000 square foot building is located at the corner of casio padre parkway and more right ave. another 13,000 square feet is being set aside for a another retailer. the fremont store will be the sixth store in the east bay. a date has not been released on when the store will be opened. >> the united nations say that more than 197 million people worldwide are without a job, and that another 39 million have given up looking for work. an annual report from the international labor ass organization says the unemployment will rise by 5.1 million this year. the u.s. and wor
'll tell what you, if the economy keeps getting better over the next three years, you've got hillary linton rclin running three years from now, we republicans have such a major headwind in our face for the next three years. it's going to be tough. >> yeah, there's no question. but there's so many variables. >> go ahead. >> no, so many variables that could happen in the next 3 1/2 years. >> yeah. ed sees you making a motion, he stops. >> i was trying to get richard haass in on this. >> she wants some more 'roids. >> andrea, i'm sorry, we cut you off. >> no, there are other points about the politics of it. joe biden is going to be at the white house, in closed meetings with the president today and has had a very high-profile role. clearly, this is the interview that he would have wanted to see. and when you talk to a lot of leading democrats who were in town this weekend, they were saying that joe biden has everything going for him except that hillary clinton is a woman and is a celebrity and has the best popularity. and she has the virtue, after eight years then of barack obama and the obama
in equity. the economy is going to be lousy for the next two years. >> so we're running this online poll which is asking this question, this lack of current crisis that we have, is that because there has been real progress or is it century? >> no. i think it's a product. the ecb has stepped up and merkel and others committed to some day doing the kinds of physical transfers of banking units they need. and there has been some real progress even off that cleanup. but none of that is going to offset the unemployment numbers, barred from that the lack of investment, the constraint on demand from the austerity programs, the feedback in europe. so, again, it is real progress, but that's not going translate to growth anytime soon. >> when you say not going to translate into growth, what is the outlook? >> to me, what i've been saying for a few months is that europe's past is bounded from below and from above. we've ruled out the worst of the crisis, thank god. but the austerity, unemployment and continued downward wage pressures put a tight ceiling on growth. so germany is growing less than 11%
from our economy, particularly for hispanics and african-americans. >> dana, the stock market is at a five-time high -- a five-year high. unemployment is at a five-year low. he says on the one hand he wants to reach out. you can see the shares in the dow jones right now. what is this man talking about? please, translate it because i'm not intelligent enough to understand it. >> there is apparently a bit of a mixed message occurring at the rnc winter meeting. >> in the very brain of the chairman. >> i think bobby jindal had a point where he said we need to stop being the party of austerity. we need to stop saying how good we can be at shrinking and cutting government. that is not a winning message. he's absolutely right about that. and then you have the party here in washington doing exactly what he said not to do, and you have paul ryan coming forward and saying, yes, i'm going to -- we lost the election so i'm actually going to double down on this. i'm going to cut 40% of the federal government out over the next ten years because that's exactly what the people want to hear an
in the red for 2012. the world's third biggest economy has posted a trade deficit of $78.3 billion. u.s. house ever presented this has passed a bill to extend the debt limit until may. it effectively put off the possibility of the u.s. defaulted on its debt. three weeks earlier, congress and the white house hammered out the last-minute deal to prevent the so-called fiscal cliff. the u.s. debt stands at $16.50 trillion. the british prime minister has been building on wednesday's historic speech about his country's future with the european union. david carolwood speaking at the world economic forum -- david cameron was speaking at the world economic forum in switzerland. >> britain has a choice purdue and hope it stands back and the argument -- britain has a choice. they can stand back or say yes, the european union needs to change to suit the euro but also to suit all of us as well. make the argument for a flexible, competitive euro, take the british people with you. >> south africa is looking at newark power for its future nuclear ended -- at nuclear power for its future and nuclear e
community reacted in a very still a way to the threat of but leaving, saying that the german economy would be able to cope with that, though it would of course regret it. even more important, perhaps, the united states reacted very negatively. the relationship between britain and the united states has been the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting disease are also priorities. he's expected to easily win approval for the job from the senate. to syria where authorities have called for a million-man prayer at mosques on friday in an effort to stem anti-regime demonstrations. >> the embattled president was also shown on state television praying with syr
. >> that is not the option we would like. we would like to see all of europe becoming more flexible. the global economy has doubled in value since 2000. how much of that has been seen in europe? very little. they're too many regulations, too much legislation, and the trouble with the european union at the moment is that it is too inward looking, it should be talking about how it becomes more competitive on a global basis. if these companies are going to want an ever closer union as a result of the problems created by the euro, why should britain not want to take advantage of the changing your pandemic to give britain a chance to become more competitive? the changes going to happen. we want that changed to be a direction that suits the british people. >> i can see you gesticulating. did you want to come in? >> we have become competitive within the european union. germany has given the example, we were able to become competitive. we of a higher debt ratio the most of the member states in the eurozone. higher unemployment questions. this has nothing to do with the european union, other countries have shown th
a huge gamble with our economy. he is running scared. is given into his party and he can't deliver for britain and. i have politely to say to the right honorable gentleman, his whole argument about there being uncertainty is undermined by the fact that he cannot answer whether he wants a referendum or not. can i give him a little bit of advice? he needs to go away, get the policy, come back and tell us what it is. meantime, our approach is what the british people want. it's right for business. it's right for our economy, and we will fight for it in the years ahead. >> mr. caplan barwell. >> mr. speaker, around the world 170 million people, children under the age of five are so malnourished it has affected the physical and possibly their cognitive development. the world has enough feared for it when. we must launch a major paint against malnutrition for children. >> my honorable friend is not so the right to raise this issue, particularly as we share the g8 this year and because some of the leading ngos like save the children have quite rightly launched this campaign today. above al
economy was not a growing economy. it was a stagnating economy. virginia's agricultural economy was not a growing economy. but a stagnating one. and the reason why so many slaves were sold out of the upper south to the lower south is because in many ways there weren't new slaves needed in virginia and maryland and north carolina, where they were needed were in the new cotton lands of the southwest, and so an owner quite often might have what he considered excess capacity, and so he would sell off one or two slaves here. almost always breaking up families, because what sold and brought money in the market place were people aged 15 to 30 years. and so that usually meant breaking up families. husbands and wives, brothers and sisters, mothers and fathers and their children. and they would be sent to richmond, which was a bit of a gathering place, and most of the slaves purchased in richmond were purchased not by slave owners but by other slave traders. so then would take them hundreds of miles away, either marching them overland where the men would be chained together two-by-two, th
, but from outside it. from a surging economy of the east and the south. a growing world economy benefits us all. we should be in no doubt that a new global rates of nations is underway today. a race for the wealth and for the jobs of the future. .. and the industrial revolution to nonfans to write european history in europe has helped to radars. has made a contribution to europe. we have provided a haven to those fleeing tyranny in persecution. we keep the flame of liberty alive. across the continent, and silent cemeteries played hundreds of thousands of british servicemen who gave their lives for europe's freedom we paid our parts for the iron curtain and champ named into the e.u. of those countries that lost so many figures to communists. contained in this history is a crucial point about britain, our natural character, our attitude to europe. britain is characterized, but above all by his openness. we've always been a country that reaches out that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. as today as it's always been. independent, yes, but open to. i never w
state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a half in/half out role for the u.k. that is very concerning to the u.s. because he has raised the stakes by saying he would put it to the british people in the referendum. if they vote to get out of the e.u. th
, of the global economy and also for us in europe, um, is free trade. we have, unfortunately, a lot of protectionist tendencies in the world today. when we met at the g20 meeting outlined this time and again and impressed this on us, and we need to do everything we can in order to contain these protectionist tendencies. the doha round, the world trade organization has not, unfortunately, developed in such a positive direction as we wished. so in the future, too, unfortunately, we need to pin our hopes on financial trade agreements. and germany, i can promise you, will be very proactive as regards the conclusion of such fha agreements. we've now given the mandate for a free trade agreement with japan, with canada. we're shortly before conclusion of an fta with the -- [inaudible] states. we urgently need to come to such agreements. and after decades of failed attempts, we would like to do this with the united states as well, develop such a free trade agreement with the european union. quite often cultural exports are a bit bit of a hurdle here on bh sides, but i think we need to do, w
economy will look like in a few years if we continue to follow president obama's agenda. president obama loves to beat up his predecessors and republicans for the state of the nation's economy and crisis the last few years, but in illinois we can't make such excuses. we've been following the big government model for decades and you can see where it's gotten us. stuart: and they can't meet the pensions, the fundamental problem with illinois, the pension what the argument is about. >> pension is the driver, but you look at what other states are doing, wisconsin passed collective bargaining reform, indiana and michigan have passed right to work laws and in illinois we're still beholden to the government employee unions that these politicians refuse to reform the 200 billion pension crisis we're under. stuart: ted. >> we've got to go for big fixes. stuart: right now i want to just concentrate on chicago for a second. >> okay. stuart: i'm told that the mayor, rahm emanuel, he's got a commission looking into the city's finances and that commission suggests that he they should shift their retir
on fox and making things understandable when it comes to the economy. thank you, we appreciate it. and this from john, i dvr your show every day, like your range of topics and style and we like the company. thank you. and grant, he's made an investment in fox business just for "varney & company." quote, i had to pay $10 per month more for my dish tv service to get fox business news. well worth it. even on a fixed income. thank you, grant. he we appreciate that. we'll read your comments throughout the show today and play you some favorite memories what we were doing the last three years, like this. my pen just disintegrated. [laughter] and don't know how that happened. and it just collapsed in my very hand here, i'm penless. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium br
economies in the east and the south. now, of course, a growing world economy benefits us all, but we should be in no doubt that a new global race of nations is underway today. a race for the wealth and for the jobs of the future. the map of global influence is changing before our eyes. and these changes are already being felt by the entrepreneur in the netherlands, the worker in germany, the family in britain. so i want to speak to you today with urgency and frankness about the european union and how it does change, both to deliver prosperity and to retain the support of its peoples. but first, i want to set out the spirit in which i approach these issues. i know that the united kingdom is sometimes seen as an argumentative and rather strong-minded member of the family of european nations. and it is true that our geography has shaped our psychology. we have the character of an island nation. we are independent, forthright, passionate in defense of our sovereignty. we can no more change this british sensibility than we can train the english channel. and because of this sensibility, we come t
be a coalition partner for netanyahu. rather than security issues, it is the economy that is dominating the of said -- the debate. netanyahu maybe on his way to another victory, but it is far from plain sailing. the parties are likely to be ideologically different. for netanyahu, winning the selection and now may be the easy part. >> the trial of five men accused of raping a woman on of us have begun a fast track court in new delhi. the case has caused public outcry, and many are demanding women get better protection. the victim died two weeks after the incident. eight people have been killed in an attack in the afghan capital. a group of taliban gunmen stormed the building and took control of it for several hours. two policemen were among those killed. french prosecutors have charged an ethnic man with the murder of three female kurdish activists. he worked as a driver for the founder of the workers' party. she and two activists were found dead at a kurdish center in paris two weeks ago. the killing sparked protests from the community of kurds in france. russia is sending two passenger
economies is altering the balance of power in the region. she urged the united states and china to avoid any miscalculations over potential hotspots, referring to territorial disputes in the south china and east china seas. >> we remain optimistic about china around the united states to manage change in the region but it brings with it strategic competition as china's global interests expand. >> gillard called for the peaceful resolution of disagreements through dialogue using forums such as the east asia summit. she said australia would work closely other countries to help solve problems through diplomacy. >>> afghan security forces will take the lead in their own country. repeated insider attacks have damaged trust w suspicions rising on both sides, military come plaerpsd sending soldiers back to school for a some lessons in cultural tolerance. >> we should know the heroes we honor today will not have died in vain. amen. >> reporter: some 440 soldiers died last year in afghanistan. 61 were victims of insider attacks. that's about 30 times the number five years ago. rising anti-u.s. sentime
looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
the economy is the same and have swapped a secular dictatorship for another one. i spoke to a professor of diplomacy at harvard, and he said that who would have predicted two years ago egypt would still have a strong work relationship with the u.s., would have stood by the camp david peace accord so perhaps there's room for optimism. >> there is, i think, a ray of hope this keystone country, this very important country in the middle of the arab world, might be able to move forward, hasp in a very problematic way but not terribly destabilizing. >> listen to the caution in that as well. not tremendously destabilizing for the region. nobody knows the future. >> shepard: we don't have much strategy and the rest of the region is a disaster. >> of course, it is not just egypt we're concerned about right now. the events recently, the taking of hostages at the gas facility in al jeer a, set alarm bells ringing about the work of islamic extremists, and you look right across the region, libya egypt, tune knee should, algeria, and mali. and nicholas burns again said this could go on for lang time.
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